Canadian Band Plan

How To Get Your Canadian  Ham License

For quite a number of years I was interested in ham radio but never seemed to have the time to study what was needed for the Industry Canada exam. Once I retired I decided that it was time to go after that elusive ticket. The requirements had changed somewhat and it was now possible to get a ham ticket without having to learn morse code. Some older hams were not happy with this change stating that "a real ham knows the code". Other hams felt that the change was good as it encouraged more people to participate in the hobby.

If you are interested in obtaining your ham license, here is a bit of information that may answer a few of the questions that you may have had about getting into the hobby.
The first thing that I would recommend is to join an amateur radio club. There are many advantages to joining a club. Many clubs offer very good classes to help you learn everything you need to know in order to pass the Industry Canada exam. Most clubs have very reasonable membership fees. For example, I joined the Mississauga Amateur Radio Club (MARC) with a membership fee of $30. per year. MARC is one of the clubs that not only offer classes for both the basic and advanced license, but two of their members are accredited Industry Canada Examiners, so you can write the exam right there at the club. The other great advantage of joining a club is that there are a lot of experienced hams there who are more than willing to offer a wealth of knowledge and help to anyone who needs it.

The second thing you should do is to pick yourself up a book such as "Canadian Amateur Radio Basic Qualification Study Guide". This is the book used by MARC for their classes. If you join a club that offers classes, you may want to check to see which book they use first.

The third thing you should do is to download the Industry Canada exam generator (its free). This is a piece of software that generates questions from the Industry Canada exam question database. All exam questions are multiple answer questions and the exam consists of 100 questions drawn at random from this database. The examiner actually uses this software to generate your exam so you can test yourself using this software while you are learning to see if, and where, you may have any weak spots.

You can download the Exam Generator here.

To obtain your Basic Amateur Radio license you are required to achieve a passing mark of at least 60%. If you achieve a passing mark of 80% or more, you will receive a Basic + qualification. What is the difference between the Basic qualification and Basic + qualification? The Basic license allows you to operate radio equipment on all bands above 30MHz using a maximum of 250 watts DC input. The Basic + qualification allows you to operate on all bands above and below 30MHz. These additional frequencies are referred to as the HF bands (high frequency bands).

Some of you may be asking if ham radio is an expensive hobby? One of our club members once jokingly told me, "In this hobby you can go as far as you can afford." While it is true that some hams, who can afford it, have some very elaborate ham stations, the average ham does not. Basically, all that you really need to get started is a tranceiver and an antenna. There are many places, such as eBay and Ontario Swap Shop, where you can find very good used tranceivers and antennas at reasonable prices. You can also find some very good deals at local Hamfests. But, in fact, you don't even need a tranceiver or an antenna to get started as a new ham. Once you have passed the exam and received your call sign you can use Echolink. Echolink allows you to talk to other hams all over the world using your computer, and a pair of headphones with a boom microphone or any other type of computer microphone. When I first got my ticket, and I was waiting to get some equipment, I talked to hams in New Zealand, Australia, France, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands as well as many of the U.S. states just using Echolink. In fact, I still use Echolink on a regular basis to talk to some hams who have become good friends.

So if you have an interest in the hobby of ham radio don't hesitate any longer. It is fairly simple to get your Basic or Basic + license. I started the class with MARC in mid October and received my call sign in mid December. Get your call sign and start rag chewing with other hams around the world. Maybe even earn some awards such as WAS (Worked All States) or the DXCC award for working 100 countries. Enjoy the hobby and more importantly,….Have fun!

Canadian HF Band Plan

160 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

1.800 - 1.820 MHz - CW
1.820 - 1.830 MHz - Digital Modes
1 830 - 1.840 MHz - DX Window
1.840 - 2.000 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes

80 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

3.500 - 3.580 MHz - CW
3.580 - 3.620 MHz - Digital Modes
3.620 - 3.635 MHz - Packet/Digital Secondary
3.635 - 3.725 MHz - CW
3.725 - 3.790 MHz - SSB and other side band modes*
3.790 - 3.800 MHz - SSB DX Window
3.800 - 4.000 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes

* 80 metres normally LSB, to stay within Band Plan SSB should not be lower than 3.728 MHz.

  As example note US stations cannot operate below 3.753 MHz

40 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

7.000 - 7.035 MHz - CW
7.035 - 7.050 MHz - Digital Modes
7.040 - 7.050 MHz - International packet
7.050 - 7.100 MHz - SSB
7.100 - 7.120 MHz - Packet within Region 2
7.120 - 7.150 MHz - CW
7.150 - 7.300 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes

30 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 1 kHz

10.100 - 10.130 MHz - CW only
10.130 - 10.140 MHz - Digital Modes
10.140 - 10.150 MHz - Packet

20 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

14.000 - 14.070 MHz - CW only
14.070 - 14.095 MHz - Digital Mode
14.095 - 14.099 MHz - Packet
14.100 MHz - Beacons
14.101 - 14.112 MHz - CW, SSB, packet shared
14.112 - 14.350 MHz - SSB
14.225 - 14.235 MHz - SSTV

17 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

18.068 - 18.100 MHz - CW
18.100 - 18.105 MHz - Digital Modes
18.105 - 18.110 MHz - Packet
18.110 - 18.168 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes

15 Metre Band - maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

21.000 - 21.070 MHz - CW
21.070 - 21.090 MHz - Digital Modes
21.090 - 21.125 MHz - Packet
21.100 - 21.150 MHz - CW and SSB
21.150 - 21.335 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes
21.335 - 21.345 MHz - SSTV
21.345 - 21.450 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes

12 Metre Band - Maximum bandwidth 6 kHz

24.890 - 24.930 MHz - CW
24.920 - 24.925 MHz - Digital Modes
24.925 - 24.930 MHz - Packet
24.930 - 24.990 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes

10 Metre Band - Maximum band width 20 kHz

28.000 - 28.200 MHz - CW
28.070 - 28.120 MHz - Digital Modes
28.120 - 28.190 MHz - Packet
28.190 - 28.200 MHz - Beacons
28.200 - 29.300 MHz - SSB and other wide band modes
29.300 - 29.510 MHz - Satellite
29.510 - 29.700 MHz - SSB, FM and repeaters


Priviledges

Frequency (MHz)
Lower edge
Frequency (MHz)
Upper edge
Maximum Bandwidth
Qualifications
1.8
2.0
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
3.5
4.0
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
7.0
7.3
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
10.1
10.15
1 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
14.0
14.350
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
18.068
18.168
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
21.0
21.450
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
24.890
24.990
6 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
28.0
29.7
20 kHz
B+, B5 or BA
50.0
54.0
30 kHz
B
144
148
30 kHz
B
220
225
100 kHz
B
430
450
12 MHz
B **
902
928
12 MHz
B **
1,240
1300
Not Specified
B **
2,300
2,450
Not Specified
B **
3,300
3,500
Not Specified
B **
5,650
5,925
Not Specified
B **
10,000
10,500
Not Specified
B **
24,000
24,050
Not Specified
B
24,050
24,250
Not Specified
B **
47,000
47,200
Not Specified
B
75,500
76,000
Not Specified
B
76,000
81,000
Not Specified
B **
142,000
144,000
Not Specified
B
144,000
149,000
Not Specified
B **
241,000
248,000
Not Specified
B **
248,000
250,000
Not Specified
B
Notes:
"B" means an Amateur Operators Certificate with Basic Qualification
"B+" means an Amateur Operators Certificate with Basic Qualification "with Honours" (where the holder achieved 80% or higher on the examination
"B5" means an Amateur Operators Certificate with Basic Qualification and Morse Code (5 w.p.m.) Qualification
"BA" means an Amateur Operators Certificate with Basic and Advanced Qualification
Radio Amateurs are secondary users in the bands marked with asterisks **, and may not cause interference to primary users.